Forest Therapy Is...

Forest Therapy, also known as Forest Bathing and Shinrin-Yoku, is a therapeutic practice that guides people to an inner state of relaxation and sensory restoration through doing a series of sensory oriented invitations that bring them into present moment relationship with the forest. It is a gentle, physically undemanding practice that takes place in an area of forest or along a forest trail. The practice supports the health of both humans and forests. The therapeutic benefits of this practice are primarily attributed to the interaction and relationship between the client and the forest environment, with the forest therapy guide utilizing the best practices for bringing the client into this relationship. It is a practice within the larger field of eco-therapy and ecopsychology.

A session is typically 2-4 hrs long and consists of a serious of invitations following the standard flow model. There is a breathing in and out of group and personal time. The group time primarily consists of sharing circles that support the deepening and integration of the experience. Forest therapy focuses on pleasurable experiences as a gateway into the relaxation of the body and a deepening of connection with the forest environment. It is typical for participants to feel relaxed and have greater clarity about their lives during and after a forest therapy session.

At GIFT we are committed to promoting and further developing an integral practice that health care professionals can depend on to be both professional and therapeutically reliable. We are also committed to a model of forest therapy that is truly holistic, that is it recognizes and embodies holistic healthcare whereby human health and natural ecosystem health are embedded within each other and mutally dependent. 

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origins of forest therapy

Not dating back as far as you might think, Shinrin Yoku...

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green prescriptions

Given that we live on a planet with an abundance of life, it...

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the global movement of forest therapy

Sure, it started in Japan...